Page 30 - COG Publications

Basic HTML Version

MYSTERY OF THE AGES
Pennsylvania with William Penn, a hundred years
before the United States became a nation.
I
had been reared from earliest childhood in the
Quaker faith, but religious interest in those formative
years was passive.
At age 18
I
virtually dropped all interest in religion,
and ceased attending church.
I
had, at 18, put myself
through an intensive self-analysis, coupled with a survey
of the occupations and professions to determine where
I
belonged-to avoid being the proverbial square peg in
the round hole.
Even at that age
I
had observed that most people
were simply victims of circumstance. Few had ever
planned intelligently their future lives. Many or most
had stumbled into whatever job they found open. They
did not choose where, in what part of the country or the
world, they should live. They had been buffeted about
by circumstance. Those who went to college chose
whatever course or profession that appealed to them at
the time.
But when
I
was yet only 16, a summer-vacation
employer had, by praise for work well done and general
encouragement, aroused the burning fire of ambition
within me. Ambition is not only the desire for accom–
plishment, it includes the will and the drive to
pay the
price!
This self-analysis at age 18 led me into the
advertising profession and a business life.
I
studied
diligently, "burning the midnight oil," instead of
seeking youthful pleasures.
I
became unusually successful.
I
worked hard, had a
reputation as a "hustler."
I
studied diligently, worked
toward self-improvement. All this, of course, developed
great self-confidence, which was later to be replaced by
a different kind of confidence-FAITH in Christ.
14